Some things are worth remembering . . .

Some things are worth remembering . . .

Fifteen years.

That’s how much time has passed since the worst terror attack this country has ever known.  Those of us who are old enough to remember that day know exactly where we were and what we were doing when we first found out about the attacks on the World Trade Center towers.

I was working in an insurance office, and the first we were made aware of the attack was when the son of the owner called to say a plane had hit one of the twin towers.  At the time no one knew if it was just an accident or something worse.

Then the second plane hit the other tower, and there was no longer any doubt in our minds.  This was intentional.  This was war.

We didn’t have a television in the office, but quickly turned up the volume on the radio and listened intently to reports as they came in.  Everyone looked at each other in shock—not believing what we were hearing.  It was like a nightmare.  I suddenly understood the trepidation in my parents’ voices when they recalled where they were the day Pearl Harbor was attacked.

Soon was the news that the Pentagon had also been hit by a plane and was on fire.  I think that’s when it became very real for me.  This was a planned attack on our country by people who were evil.  It wasn’t just a random event—they’d been orchestrating this attack for years, meticulously planning each and every moment of it.

I’m more thankful than I can say for the passengers of the United Airlines flight who chose to fight back that day, rather than allow a fourth plane to hit the White House.  How brave they were.  I think I mourn their losses even more than the others as they chose to die for their country.

I wasn’t going to write anything about 9/11—even though it’s an important anniversary of that tragic day.  Then I thought about the fact that today’s teenagers have no idea what it felt like to live through that day and the days following.  All air flights were cancelled, people were sent home from work, we all went to churches and prayed for the lost and for our country.  There was fear in the land, and our innocence was lost.  We weren’t as safe as we’d thought we were.  In the ensuing months, we feared even to open our mail as anthrax was sent through the postal service to several agencies.  It felt as if our world had changed forever.

And it had.

I don’t know about you, but I don’t want to live in fear, but I also think it’s important that we learn from what happened on 9/11 and never forget how precious the freedoms are that we enjoy in this country.  And we need to make certain that our children and our grandchildren are taught the truth about that day.  We WERE attacked by evil.  And it COULD happen again.

Hopefully, we’ve learned this most important thing—take nothing for granted.  It can be lost so quickly.

And remember, as Christians, our true freedom can NEVER be taken away from us.

Then said Jesus to those Jews which believed on him, If ye continue in my word, then are ye my disciples indeed; And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free.  (John 8:31-32)

 

 

memorial-day-wallpaper

 

Advertisements
Independence Day

Independence Day

When I was growing up, this holiday we now call ‘4th of July’ was almost always referred to as ‘Independence Day’.

That is because it was created initially as a day to celebrate our freedom from the British Monarchy.  July 4th has been a federal holiday in the United States since 1941, although the tradition of celebrating Independence Day goes back much further than that.

My book, The Dove and The Raven takes place during the latter years of the American Revolutionary War–that time in our country’s history when we were battling for our freedom to be in independent nation.  I have ancestors who fought in that war, and I think of them every time this holiday rolls around.  I’m sure they’d be distressed to see how so many folks in our country are unappreciative of the freedoms they fought so diligently to obtain.

If you are interested in reading a Christian Historical novel (with a little romance thrown in), but sure to stop over to either Amazon or Barnes and Noble and pick up a copy of The Dove and The Raven.  It’s perfect reading for this holiday weekend!

And it doesn’t matter whether you call it ‘4th of July’ or ‘Independence Day’ — either way, I hope you have a safe and happy holiday with your family!

D&R COVER 2The Dove & The Raven – available at Amazon.com

The Dove & The Raven – available at Barnes&Noble.com

 

 

 

A childlike faith . . .

A childlike faith . . .

“Verily I say unto you, Except ye be converted, and become as little children, ye shall not enter into the kingdom of heaven.”  — Matthew 18:3

file1731288042960

It’s so simple, really . . . this faith we’re asked to accept.

It don’t know why so many of us struggle with it so much.

Look at a child–my grandchildren, for instance.  My two youngest granddaughters are at the age where they still accept most of what their parents and grandparents tell them–without question.  They trust the adults in their lives and look on them as comforters, and safe havens of love.

That is exactly how our Heavenly Father wants us to look on Him.

So, accept His care and guidance without doubt, without worry.  Because as much as our earthly parents love/loved us, His love is so much more.

Be a child . . . and find that childlike faith once again.

 

In Christian love,

Ruth Kyser

 

To find out more about me and the Christian Fiction books I’ve written, be sure and check out my website at     http://authorruthkyser.weebly.com/

 

 

A warm legacy . . .

I’m a writer of Christian Fiction.  I spend my days weaving tales of romance and intrigue.

But that doesn’t mean that’s the only thing I like to do.

One of the things I most enjoy doing on really cold winter days is quilting.  There’s something cozy about pulling your latest project onto your lap–especially when it’s a thick, warm quilt.

I don’t know how other quilters make their projects, but I’ve always hand-sewn mine.  There’s something satisfying about looking at the finished product and knowing every stitch and wrinkle.  They aren’t fancy quilts, but are made with patchwork pieces–some of which I’ve had for years.  It may take me years to make one quilt, but they’re made to last–hopefully long after I’m gone.

My current project is a flower basket pattern; it’s not made the conventional way, but instead made using handkerchiefs for the basket part of the blocks.  The handkerchiefs are precious to me as some of them were mine when I was a child.  There are also some that were my mother’s, my mother-in-law’s, and my husband’s grandmothers’.  Hopefully it’s a way of passing down to one of my granddaughters something to remind her of her roots–the women whose strong will and get-it-done attitude she will hopefully inherit.

I also pray I can instill in my grandchildren the beliefs of their ancestors–the faith that kept them going no matter what trials and tribulations came their way.  That inheritance is so much more important than a quilt.

Train up a child in the way he should go: and when he is old, he will not depart from it. – Prov. 22:6

Blessings to you, my friends.
And keep warm.  8487_1117145348296017_7537366304963948335_n

Ruth Kyser

 

 

Oh, and don’t forget, Ruth is a Writer.

You can find all of her books at Amazon or Barnes&Noble